Monday, May 25, 2020

3d Printing Of Care And Patient Outcomes - 1029 Words

3D Printing in Healthcare All throughout the world there are constant technological innovations. As time progresses, more inventions come about and alter our lives. Since the industrial revolution we as a nation have had plenty of technological advances that have impacted our lives. Healthcare is one of the most prominent and impactful systems in the world. Technology in healthcare can ultimately make a huge difference in the performance of care and patient outcomes. One recently new innovation in health care is three dimensional printing. 3D printing is a manufacturing method where objects are made by fusing or depositing material. This is revolutionary for healthcare due to the rapid fabrication of tissue and organs, customized prosthetics, and implants. 3D printing can create object in any shape imaginable thanks to the two dozen printing processes. 3D printing first made its appearance in the early 1980’s by Charles Hull. In 1988, Hull founded the company 3D Systems, which developed the first commercially available 3D printer. Hull set great footsteps for future generations to follow. As known, 3D printing has been used in manufacturing industries for decades. Three dimensional printing can largely benefit healthcare and medical uses due to the customization, cost efficiency, and the rapid productivity. Customization is a great advantage to 3D printing because it allows for custom made medical products and equipment that is prepared for each body and fixture. The timeShow MoreRelatedCurrent And Projected Healthcare Applications Of 3d Printing Essay3058 Words   |  13 PagesIntroduction Three-dimensional (3D) printing, also known as rapid prototyping (RP) and additive manufacturing (AM), is a transformational technology that is anticipated to revolutionize the healthcare industry. Current and projected healthcare applications of 3D printing include: customized prosthetics; personalized surgical implants; drug delivery, pre-operative and educational anatomical models; and tissue and organ engineering. The implications of 3D printing are expected to be considerableRead MoreWhat Did The Lord Made?3169 Words   |  13 Pagesalso the care required for the babies goes down also. As time has gone on there have been many more new discoveries and treatments that have been made available. One of these technologies is printing. The simple task of printing has been around seen 1843, when the printing press was first invented, but it has evolved. When someone thinks of printing they may think of newspapers, offices making copies, etc. The printing industry has evolved so much that they are now doing a process called 3D printingRead MoreTotal Hip Arthroplasty ( Tha )1166 Words   |  5 Pagesquality of life in patients with end-stage hip osteoarthritis. The incidence of THA is expected to increase due to the growing elderly population. Nevertheless, THA is becoming more common in younger populations because of the improvements in implant durability(D,C). Ideal candidates for an elective procedure are adults with severe joint pain daily, rest pain several days per week, transfer pain several days per week, and destruction of most of the joint space on radiograph (E). Patients who undergo electiveRead MoreHow Technology Has Changed The Act Of Nursing2153 Words   |  9 Pagesof nursing in years to come (Huston, 2013). Since 3D printing was introduced in 1989, hospital, physicians and the public have seen how creating customized medical devices such as dental implants, hearing aids, contact lenses, and prosthesis have offered many advantages for the patients. â€Å"The reach of 3D printing has improved and even saved lives. In 2011, a man in the UK who lost half his pelvis to bone cancer received a new pelvis created of 3D materials, and is still happy with the results. InRead MoreDefining The Fundamental Responsibilities And Key Characteristics Of The Chief Information Officer Essay899 Words   |  4 Pages Define the fundamental responsibilities and key characteristics of the Chief Information Officer (CIO) and Chief Technology Officer (CTO) within health care organizations. Chief Information Officer (CIO) or Information Technology (IT) Director, is a job title commonly given to the most senior executive in an enterprise responsible for the information technology and computer systems that support enterprise goals. Generally, the CIO reports to the chief executive officer, chief operating officerRead MoreHigh School Career - Original Writing2286 Words   |  10 Pagesdoubt in my mind that the answer to â€Å"what’s next† lies within 3D printing. The new fad could be 3D printing dolls and toys, food and tools! At our fingertips...a higher standard of living is possible. A memory that will never fade is possible. A healthy lifestyle is possible. The world is already raging about 3D printing and the advancements we can expect. I want to figure out all the current abilities and proposed ways to use the 3D printer. I also want begin my personal journey in the fieldRead MoreTechnology And Technology : A New Opportunity For Medicine2103 Wor ds   |  9 Pagesmachinery. One such emergence is three-dimensional printing; an idea first developed by Charles Hull in 1986. This technique encompasses the successive printing of a selected material so as to form a 3D construct of an initially digital file1. This technology has seen vast usage in art and commerce since its establishment three decades but has only recently received attention from the biotechnology industry. As of 2010 the potential of 3D printing in areas of tissue engineering and body part creationRead MoreChief Officer As A Chief Technical Officer1417 Words   |  6 Pagescollaboration and productivity for employees. Also, improving patient engagement is increasingly important for hospitals to boost clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction levels. Suggest two (2) developing technologies that health care systems should use in order to improve health care processes and thus increase the quality and lower the cost of health services. EHRs help providers communicate with each other about a patient’s care. EHRs make it easier for physicians, hospitals, and others toRead MoreTissue Engineering in Replace of Organ Donation1353 Words   |  5 PagesOrgan donation provided a new therapeutic path when new drugs and devices failed to reduce the mortality and morbidity rate of patients with such illnesses as cardiovascular diseases. By replacing damaged organs or tissue with a functioning substitute, organ transplantation offers an immediate cure. Unfortunately, this â€Å"cure† is never guaranteed because of the high risk of graft rejection and that’s if a suitable donor can be found. Thus, tissue engineering has been the projected new treatmentRead MoreImpact Of Technology In Nursing1510 Words   |  7 Pagesencompasses social media, telehealth, electronic health records, informatics, and even genetics. With technology, healthcare has completely changed in its way of organization, caring for i ts patients, communications, treatments, care plans, and even its level of efficiency. Recently, there has been things such as 3D-printing, VR/AR, artificial intelligence, robots, and nanotechnology that has been changing the way of healthcare everyday (10 Ways Technology Is Changing Healthcare, 2017). Although there has

Friday, May 15, 2020

Can You Use Pine or Cedar for Firewood

Although pine has very inefficient firewood properties for use in a stove or fireplace, pine and other conifers can be used with some safety precautions. In regions where wood from conifers is plentiful and hardwood is hard to find, you should use it and can often get it for free. Free wood is desirable in principle, but the more advisable hardwood firewood is a more efficient and cleaner wood to burn. Always use seasoned hardwood firewood for sustained heat with fewer negative effects on wood-burning systems. The major problem with burning pine is that there are significant solid deposits of flammable creosote that will build  up in a stovepipe or in the fireplace chimney over time. This buildup of combustible creosote over seasons of use can ignite and cause a fire in stoves, fireplaces, and chimneys. Thus, there is a slightly increased risk of a house fire when using resinous woods. All conifers, including pine, will burn hot with a flash of high temperatures, but that heat will be unsustainable over time. A fire of coniferous wood needs to be tended often with large wood volumes. As explained above, the unburned combustibles  that coat the chimney can cause a flue fire, so it is extremely important to have your flue cleaned regularly if you are burning coniferous wood. Should You Use Cedar? Many cedars, including red cedar, are especially poor firewood choices. You should not use most cedar species in any stove or fireplace you value. Obviously, the wood will burn, but it should be used only in an open outside area where smoke and explosive heat are of less concern. Remember that most cedar species are loaded with volatile oils that are extracted for many uses. Cedars are the next best thing to a resin-soaked pine knot for starting wood fires, and cedar makes for a great natural kindling source. Using it for starting your fires is just fine. But burning it exclusively is not recommended. Pockets of these cedar oils will cause pops and spits of fire sparks and embers, making it quite dangerous for use in an open, inside fireplace. Some people do use cedar for a quick warm-up during the spring and fall seasons, where a short burst of hot fire can take the chill off. One thing not to blame cedars for: It has not been proven that cedars produce toxic smoke, unlike some glue fumes in composite wood products. Never burn composite wood products like plywood, chipboard, or OSB (oriented strand board). Smells Matter! All stoves have some smell, which many people like, especially when using aromatic woods. A cloying smell that becomes obnoxious is worth checking, however. It is probably due to a leaky system. Check your stoves condition and pipes for leaks. Opening windows, in some cases, can make the problem worse. Always have a wood stove expert check your unit.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Essay on Rousseaus Philosophy in Mary Shelleys Frankenstein

In Mary Shelleys Frankenstein, the titular character states that If [mans] impulses were confined to hunger, thirst and desire, [he] might nearly be free (Shelley, 97). With this assertion, Victor imparts his belief that man is most content in the state of nature; a state where only his most primal needs must be fulfilled in order to be satisfied. Man in his natural state is the central topic in Jean-Jacques Rousseaus philosophic essay A Discourse on Inequality, an academic work that had tremendous influence on Shelley. Shelley uses three of Rousseaus major beliefs as fundamental elements of Frankenstein; man is most content in the state of nature, society is what corrupts him and once corrupted, he can never return to his natural†¦show more content†¦He is oblivious to the fact that his appearance is horrific and has no knowledge of the concept of evil because he has had no exposure to society (Edwards). The monster does not know that civilized man views his ugly exterio r as representative of evil within, so he is baffled when the occupant of a hut he stumbles upon produces a terrified shriek and runs away (Shelley, 105). The monster later comes to know good and evil; virtue and vice; due to the fact that he possesses the faculty of perfectibility Ââ€" mans inexhaustible ability to improve himself (Â…) and be shaped by his environment (Edwards). This quality of adaptability allows for enlightenment to occur, but is ultimately the source of all of mans misery. The monster becomes malignant through his exposure to society, a phenomenon that is congruent with Rousseaus doctrine. The monster as natural man is nomadic; he roams from place to place, eating and resting where he can. When he finds adequate shelter in the hovel attached to the De Laceys cottage it becomes convenient for him to stay there. According to Rousseaus discourse, new conveniences [weaken] bodies and minds, and [eventually turn] into needs (Edwards). The monsters newfound kennel is directly adjacent to a familial society; one that Ââ€" due to his perfectibility Ââ€" transforms him irrevocably by producing a need for assimilation. Rousseau writes that withoutShow MoreRelatedRousseau s Views On Inequality And Origin Of Languages1513 Words   |  7 Pagesarticles have found and appreciated that Jean Jacques Rousseau philosophies are present in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Rousseau’s essay Discourse on Inequality and Origin of Languages can be directly co rrelated with the development of the creature in Frankenstein. While it is clear that Rousseau’s philosophies follow the transformation of the creature I sparked more of an interest in the philosophies of John Locke and connecting his philosophies with the transformation of the creature. John Locke’s EssayRead MoreThe Romantic Movement1322 Words   |  5 Pagesemotional aspect of literature, was a period when such novels as Frankenstein; or the Modern Prometheus were written, being very different than novels written before this era. Romantic thinkers and writers, such as Mary Shelley, believed that imagination was the crucial way of thinking. They often depicted their heroes in their novels as â€Å"creative artists† that are determined to push beyond society’s restrictions and ways of life. Mary Shelley was similar to these writers of such concepts and had incorporatedRead MoreRomantic Elements Of Frankenstein1358 Words   |  6 PagesFrankenstein; or The Modern Prometheus, is a novel written by English author Mary Shelley in 1816. Originally intended as a gothic ghost story while on retreat in Geneva, Shelley’s novel would later become the groundwork for modern science fiction and horror. As a romantic piece, Frankenstein is a novel intended to entertain, to scare, and to bring a sense of unease to the reader. Culturally and historically, however, it acts as a romantic commentary on the transition from the Enlightenment periodRead More Mary Shelleys Frankenstein - The Individual and Society Essay1923 Words   |  8 PagesFrankenstein: The Individual and Society      Ã‚  Ã‚   The creatures ambiguous humanity has long puzzled readers of Mary Shelleys Frankenstein. In this essay I will focus on how Frankenstein can be used to explore two philosophical topics, social contract theory, and gender roles, in light of ideas from Shelleys two philosophical parents, William Godwin, and Mary Wollstonecraft.    What Does it Mean to be Human? Individual and Society    One historically important tradition in socialRead MoreMetamorphoses Within Frankenstein14861 Words   |  60 PagesThe Critical Metamorphoses of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein You must excuse a trif ling d eviation, From Mrs. Shelley’s marvellous narration — from th e musical Frankenstein; or, The Vamp ire’s Victim (1849) Like Coleridge’ s Ancient Mariner , who erupts into Mary Sh elley’s text as o ccasionally and inev itably as th e Monster into Victor Frankenstein’s lif e, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometh eus passes, like night, from land to land and w ith stang ely ad aptable powers of speech Read MoreMan Or Monster? By Mary Shelley s Frankenstein And Oscar Wilde s The Picture Of Dorian Gray2820 Words   |  12 Pagesresponsibility for their actions. In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, the â€Å"monsters† come from creators that will not take responsibilities for their actions and properly care for their creations; therefore, these neglecting creators are the true monsters and not the innocent, impressionable creations. Victor Frankenstein’s characterization and family background establish his nature as the true â€Å"monster† in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Victor had an idyllic childhoodRead MoreHow Does Mary Shelley Create a Sense of Dread and Horror Up to Chapter 5 in the Novel ‘Frankenstein’?6870 Words   |  28 PagesHow does Mary Shelley create a sense of dread and horror up to chapter 5 in the no vel ‘Frankenstein’? Mary Shelley wrote the novel Frankenstein. The novel is also known as the modern Prometheus. Mary Shelley, her husband Percy and Lord Byron went to Lake Geneva. Lord Byron challenged the group to a ghost story. After that Mary Shelley had a dream which then made her start writing her ghost story. Her dream was of a boy which made a machine, a man, which showed signs of life. Mary then had theRead MoreDiscuss to What Extent the Monster in Frankenstein Is Portrayed as a Tragic Hero?3265 Words   |  14 PagesDiscuss to what extent the monster in Frankenstein is portrayed as a tragic hero? Aristotelian defined tragedy as the imitation of an action that is serious and also, as having magnitude, complete in itself. It incorporates incidents arousing pity and fear, wherewith to accomplish the catharsis of such emotions. The tragic hero will most effectively evoke both our pity and terror if he is neither thoroughly good nor evil but indeed a combination of both. A tragic hero has the potential

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Psychoanalysis Of Hamlet Essay Example For Students

Psychoanalysis Of Hamlet Essay Hamlet has been praised and revered for centuries as one of William Shakespeares best known and most popular tragedies. Based on its popularity, critics alike have taken various viewpoints and theories in order to explain Hamlets actions throughout the play. The psychoanalytic point of view is one of the most famous positions taken on Hamlet. Psychoanalytic criticism is a type of literary criticism that analyzes and classifies many of the forms of psychoanalysis in the interpretation of literature. As the Concise Oxford Dictionary defines psychoanalysis, as a form of therapy that is concluced by investigating the interaction of conscious and unconscious elements in the mind (Barry 96). One of the most popularized psychoanalysts of all time was Sigmund Freud. His theories on repression most directly parallel to Hamlets actions in the play. This theory states that much of what lies in the unconscious mind has been put there by consciousness, which acts as a censor, driving underground unconscious or conscious thoughts or instincts that it deems unacceptable. Censored materials often involve infantile sexual desires (Murfin). These unconscious desires are seen in dreams, in language, in creative activity, and in neurotic behavior (Murfin). This theory of repression also is directly correlated to Freuds Oedipus complex. The Oedipus complex deals with Infantile sexuality as well, by explaining that sexuality starts at infancy with the relationship of the infant with the mother, not at puberty. The Oedipus complex assesses that the infant has the desire to discard the father and become the sexual companion of the mother (Barry 97). In analyzing Hamlet, the Oedipus Complex is clearly apparent to the reader. As a child, Hamlet always expressed the warmest fondness and affection for his mother. This adoration contained elements of disguised erotic quality, especially seen in the bed chamber scene with his mother. The Queens sensual nature and her passionate fondness of her son are two traits that show her relationship with Hamlet goes beyond the normal mother-sun relationship. Nonetheless though, Hamlet finds a love interest in Ophelia. His feelings for Ophelia are never discussed fully in the play, but it is evident to the reader that at one time he loved her because of the hurt he feels when she lies to him.At this part in the play, Hamlet insults Ophelia by telling her, Or if/ thou wilt needs marry, marry a fool, for wise men know/ well enough what monsters you make o f them. To a /nunnry, go, and quickly too (3.1.136-139). At this part in the play, it is extremely difficult for Hamlet to differentiate between his mother and Ophelia. Therefore, making his true feelings for his mother become more obscure. When Hamlets father dies and his mother re-marries, the independency of the idea of sexuality with his mother, concealed since infancy, can no longer be hid from his consciousness. Emotions which were favorable and pleasing at infancy are now emotions of abhorrence and disgust because of his repressions (Jones). In the beginning of the play he becomes extremely derisive and contemptuous to his mother. Seems, madam? Nay, it is, I know not seems. (1.2.76). When Hamlet says this, he is mocking his mothers question about why he is still mourning his fathers death. Ironically, out of the love he still has for his mother, he yields her request to remain at the court. The long repressed need to take his fathers place, by gaining his mothers devotion is first stimulated to unconscious activity by the marriage of his mother to Claudius. Claudius has usurped the position of husband to Gertrude, a position that Hamlet had once longed for. The fact that Claudius was not only the victor o fhis mothers affections, but also his uncle, aggravated the situation. Their incestuous marriage thus resembles Hamlets imaginary idea of having a sexual relationship with his mother. These unconscious desires are struggling to find conscious expression, without Hamlet being the least aware of them (Jones). As the play goes on, Hamlet encounters his fathers ghost. Upon discovering that his fathers death wasnt natural, he says with much feeling that Haste me to knowt, that I with wings as swift/ As meditation, or the thoughts of love,/ May sweep to my revenge (1.5.29-31). The ghost tells him that he was murdered by Claudius.His motives were his love for Gertrude, withou t her knowledge or consent. Hamlet is furious and seething with rage with the news of his fathers murder. Knowing the truth makes Hamlets subconscious realize that killing Claudius would be similar to killing himself. This is so because Hamlet recognizes that Claudius actions of murdering his brother and marrying Hamlets mother, mimicked Hamlets inner unconscious desires. Hamlets unconscious fantasies have always been closely related to Claudius conduct. All of Hamlets once hidden feelings seem to surface in spite of all of the repressing forces, when he cries out, Oh my prophetic soul!/ My uncle! (1.5.40-41). From here, Hamlets consciousness must deal with the frightful truth (Jones). Therefore, when dealing with Claudius, Hamlets attitude is extremely complex and intricate. The concepts of death and sexuality are interchangeable in this play (Adelman 271). To the reader, it is evident that Hamlet hates his uncle, but his despise of Claudius comes more from his jealousy than from anything else. The more Hamlet criticizes Claudius, the more his unconscious feelings start to unravel. Hence, Hamlet is faced with a dilemma by acknowledging the same feelings his uncle has towards his mother, even though he detests Claudius, and yet on the other hand, he feels the need to avenge his fathers death (Jones). It takes Hamlet a month to decide to finally take action against Claudius. Hamlet tells Horatio that Come, some music! Come, the recorders!/ For if the King like not the comedy,/ Why then belike he likes it not, perdy (3.2.276-279). After this scene in the play, Hamlet is convinced of Claudius guilt, but his own guilt prevents him from completely eliminating his uncle. Hamlet is still trying to repress his own sexual desires. It could be construed that Claudius manifests all of Hamlets passions and emotions. If Claudius is killed, then Hamlet must also be killed(Jones). The course of action that Hamlet pursues can only lead to his ruin. In the end of the play, Hamlet is finally willing to make the ultimate sacrifice: to avenge his fathers death and to kill his uncle, as well as part of himself. Hamlet will live on forever in the literary world. It has become extremely popular and famous because the reader can analyze the play from a diverse and countless number of ways. Psychoanalytic criticism is one of many ways of looking at Hamlets actions. Freud and other theorists were able to take the play and analyze it scene by scene, giving a more in-depth meaning to the actions of the characters. In a sense, Shakespeare wrote two plays in one; one play dealing with a tragedy, leaving the stage with many corpses; the other standing the test of time, in a captivating exploration into an unconscious world of the unknown. Works CitedAdelman, Janet. Man and Wife is One Flesh: Hamlet and the Confrontation with the Maternal Body. Hamlet. Ed. Susanne L. Wofford. Boston: Bedford Books of St. Martins Press, 1994. Barry, Peter. Beginning Theory. New York: Manchester University Press. 1995. Jones, Ernest. Ernest Jones: Hamlet and Oedipus. N. pag. Online. Worldwide web. 21 May 2000. Available at: http://click.go2net.com/adpopup?site=hmshape=noshapeborder=1area=DIR.EDU.HIGHERsizerepopup=1hname=UNKNOWNMurfin, Ross C. Psychoanalytic Criticism in Hamlet. Hamlet. Ed. Susanne L. Wofford. Boston: Bedford Books of St. Martins Press, 1994. Shakespear, William. Hamlet. Ed. Susanne L. Wofford. Boston: Bedford Books of St. Martins Press, 1994. "Bringing the Dolls" and "Old Crystals" Analysis EssayHamlet has been praised and revered for centuries as one of William Shakespeares best known and most popular tragedies. Based on its popularity, critics alike have taken various viewpoints and theories in order to explain Hamlets actions throughout the play. The psychoanalytic point of view is one of the most famous positions taken on Hamlet. Psychoanalytic criticism is a type of literary criticism that analyzes and classifies many of the forms of psychoanalysis in the interpretation of literature. As the Concise Oxford Dictionary defines psychoanalysis, as a form of therapy that is concluced by investigating the interaction of conscious and unconscious elements in the mind (Barry 96). One of the most popularized psychoanalysts of all time was Sigmund Freud. His theories on repression most directly parallel to Hamlets actions in the play. This theory states that much of what lies in the unconscious mind has been put there by con sciousness, which acts as a censor, driving underground unconscious or conscious thoughts or instincts that it deems unacceptable. Censored materials often involve infantile sexual desires (Murfin). These unconscious desires are seen in dreams, in language, in creative activity, and in neurotic behavior (Murfin). This theory of repression also is directly correlated to Freuds Oedipus complex. The Oedipus complex deals with Infantile sexuality as well, by explaining that sexuality starts at infancy with the relationship of the infant with the mother, not at puberty. The Oedipus complex assesses that the infant has the desire to discard the father and become the sexual companion of the mother (Barry 97). In analyzing Hamlet, the Oedipus Complex is clearly apparent to the reader. As a child, Hamlet always expressed the warmest fondness and affection for his mother. This adoration contained elements of disguised erotic quality, especially seen in the bed chamber scene with his mother. The Queens sensual nature and her passionate fondness of her son are two traits that show her relationship with Hamlet goes beyond the normal mother-sun relationship. Nonetheless though, Hamlet finds a love interest in Ophelia. His feelings for Ophelia are never discussed fully in the play, but it is evident to the reader that at one time he loved her because of the hurt he feels when she lies to him.At this part in the play, Hamlet insults Ophelia by telling her, Or if/ thou wilt needs marry, marry a fool, for wise men know/ well enough what monsters you make o f them. To a /nunnry, go, and quickly too (3.1.136-139). At this part in the play, it is extremely difficult for Hamlet to differentiate between his mother and Ophelia. Therefore, making his true feelings for his mother become more obscure. When Hamlets father dies and his mother re-marries, the independency of the idea of sexuality with his mother, concealed since infancy, can no longer be hid from his consciousness. Emotions which were favorable and pleasing at infancy are now emotions of abhorrence and disgust because of his repressions (Jones). In the beginning of the play he becomes extremely derisive and contemptuous to his mother. Seems, madam? Nay, it is, I know not seems. (1.2.76). When Hamlet says this, he is mocking his mothers question about why he is still mourning his fathers death. Ironically, out of the love he still has for his mother, he yields her request to remain at the court. The long repressed need to take his fathers place, by gaining his mothers devotion is first stimulated to unconscious activity by the marriage of his mother to Claudius. Claudius has usurped the position of husband to Gertrude, a position that Hamlet had once longed for. The fact that Claudius was not only the victor o fhis mothers affections, but also his uncle, aggravated the situation. Their incestuous marriage thus resembles Hamlets imaginary idea of having a sexual relationship with his mother. These unconscious desires are struggling to find conscious expression, without Hamlet being the least aware of them (Jones). As the play goes on, Hamlet encounters his fathers ghost. Upon discovering that his fathers death wasnt natural, he says with much feeling that Haste me to knowt, that I with wings as swift/ As meditation, or the thoughts of love,/ May sweep to my revenge (1.5.29-31). The ghost tells him that he was murdered by Claudius.His motives were his love for Gertrude, withou t her knowledge or consent. Hamlet is furious and seething with rage with the news of his fathers murder. Knowing the truth makes Hamlets subconscious realize that killing Claudius would be similar to killing himself. This is so because Hamlet recognizes that Claudius actions of murdering his brother and marrying Hamlets mother, mimicked Hamlets inner unconscious desires. Hamlets unconscious fantasies have always been closely related to Claudius conduct. All of Hamlets once hidden feelings seem to surface in spite of all of the repressing forces, when he cries out, Oh my prophetic soul!/ My uncle! (1.5.40-41). From here, Hamlets consciousness must deal with the frightful truth (Jones). Therefore, when dealing with Claudius, Hamlets attitude is extremely complex and intricate. The concepts of death and sexuality are interchangeable in this play (Adelman 271). To the reader, it is evident that Hamlet hates his uncle, but his despise of Claudius comes more from his jealousy than from anything else. The more Hamlet criticizes Claudius, the more his unconscious feelings start to unravel. Hence, Hamlet is faced with a dilemma by acknowledging the same feelings his uncle has towards his mother, even though he detests Claudius, and yet on the other hand, he feels the need to avenge his fathers death (Jones). It takes Hamlet a month to decide to finally take action against Claudius. Hamlet tells Horatio that Come, some music! Come, the recorders!/ For if the King like not the comedy,/ Why then belike he likes it not, perdy (3.2.276-279). After this scene in the play, Hamlet is convinced of Claudius guilt, but his own guilt prevents him from completely eliminating his uncle. Hamlet is still trying to repress his own sexual desires. It could be construed that Claudius manifests all of Hamlets passions and emotions. If Claudius is killed, then Hamlet must also be killed(Jones). The course of action that Hamlet pursues can only lead to his ruin. In the end of the play, Hamlet is finally willing to make the ultimate sacrifice: to avenge his fathers death and to kill his uncle, as well as part of himself. Hamlet will live on forever in the literary world. It has become extremely popular and famous because the reader can analyze the play from a diverse and countless number of ways. Psychoanalytic criticism is one of many ways of looking at Hamlets actions. Freud and other theorists were able to take the play and analyze it scene by scene, giving a more in-depth meaning to the actions of the characters. In a sense, Shakespeare wrote two plays in one; one play dealing with a tragedy, leaving the stage with many corpses; the other standing the test of time, in a captivating exploration into an unconscious world of the unknown. Works CitedAdelman, Janet. Man and Wife is One Flesh: Hamlet and the Confrontation with the Maternal Body. Hamlet. Ed. Susanne L. Wofford. Boston: Bedford Books of St. Martins Press, 1994. Barry, Peter. Beginning Theory. New York: Manchester University Press. 1995. Jones, Ernest. Ernest Jones: Hamlet and Oedipus. N. pag. Online. Worldwide web. 21 May 2000. Available at: http://click.go2net.com/adpopup?site=hmshape=noshapeborder=1area=DIR.EDU.HIGHERsizerepopup=1hname=UNKNOWNMurfin, Ross C. Psychoanalytic Criticism in Hamlet. Hamlet. Ed. Susanne L. Wofford. Boston: Bedford Books of St. Martins Press, 1994. Shakespear, William. Hamlet. Ed. Susanne L. Wofford. Boston: Bedford Books of St. Martins Press, 1994. Words/ Pages : 4,006 / 24

Sunday, April 12, 2020

The Change of Gender Roles

The notion that women cannot play a prominent role in family or society has existed for a long time. Although this trend began to change in the past two centuries, this gender stereotype continues to be very widespread. This paper is aimed at discussing such plays as Trifles written by Susan Glaspell and Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House. These authors show how women can be victimized or discriminated in a patriarchal society.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on The Change of Gender Roles specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More By depicting family conflictsï ¼Å'Susan Glaspell and Henrik Ibsen show how women can be forced into subordination. More importantly, the writers show how women challenge the conventions that are imposed on them.  There are several important similarities shared by both works. First, both works illustrate similar themes, namely the subordinate position of women and their response to this i njustice. A Doll’s House by Ibsen is a description of a woman who tries to break paternalistic relationship with her husband. Trifles written by Glaspell depict a despair of a woman who murders her husband. This similarity is one of the most  important to focus on the structure of the narrative. In both plays, the main actions of the characters are not directly described by the authors. They can be regarded as past events that help the readers understand the story. For instance, in Trifles, the murder is not depicted by Susan Glaspell. The larger part of the play shows how this murder is investigated. The audience is also introduced to the dialogue between two women who discuss about the possibility of Mrs. Wright having killed her husband. The approach to narrative is taken by Henrik Ibsen. It should be mentioned that Nora was making debt repayments for almost a decade without the knowledge of her husband. It should be kept in mind that Nora obtained the first loan by forg ing the signature of her own spouse. In order to maintain peace in their marital life, Nora thought that it would be better for her not to tell her husband the entire truth. She did not want her husband to know that she was burdened with debts. Thirdly, the supporting characters also play a key role in exposing gender dynamics that unfold throughout the plays. For instance, gender roles have been typically reversed in the A Doll’s House by other casts as well. Kristine Linde takes over the position of Mr. Krogstad. She proves to the audience that she is capable, highly efficient and independent-minded person in comparison Krogstad. She does not need the assistance of men to secure a decent job. She even opts to work while her husband stays back home. Also in Trifles, Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters find the truth about murder by investigating small details which called trifles by men. Finally both of them decide to hide evidence to protect their peer. These examples are important f or showing that women can cope with the tasks and duties of men.Advertising Looking for essay on art and design? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Additionally, both writers want readers to make their conclusion about the ending of two plays. Instead of providing detailed information about the later life of the characters, Ibsen and Glaspell prompt the audience to think about the possible ending of two plays. For instance, the readers of Susan Glaspell’s play do now know whether Mrs. Wright was acquitted or found guilty of her criminal trial. Similarly, in A Doll’s House, Nora leaves her husband, but the author does not tell what happens to her in the future.  Finally, both plays involve similar symbols that represent the female protagonists and the injustice that they have to struggle with. In Trifles, Mrs. Wright has been described as â€Å"kind of a bird herself† (Glaspell 1054) by Mrs. Hale. Moreover, broken birdcage indicates that this woman could be confined in various ways. For instance, she could not attend any social event since she was made to wear shabby clothes by her husband. In the A Doll’s House, Nora is described as â€Å"little lark† and â€Å"squirrel† by her husband by Torvald (Ibsen 1259). The doll house is literary symbol of Nora’s life. Just like what she said to her husband, Torvald: â€Å"Our home has been nothing but a playroom. I have been your doll-wife† (Ibsen 1259).  Yet, one can also identify some important differences between these literary works. Both Mrs. Wright and Nora break the law, however, the reason is different. Mrs. Wright kills her husband to protect herself because she is afraid that her husband will eventually hurt her. In contrast, Nora violates the establish behavioral norms in order to protect her husband. Just as she says:â€Å"Is a daughter not to be allowed to spare her dying father anxiety and ca re? Is a wife not to be allowed to save her husband’s life? I don’t know much about law, but I am certain that there must be laws permitting such things as that.† (Ibsen 1270). Even though both protagonists challenge dominant gender roles, their value and attitudes of these people differ significantly. Mrs. Wright wants to cope with the conventional gender roles that are imposed on her. However, the cruelty of her husband prevents her from achieving this goal. To a great extent, she is forced to kill his husband. In contrast, Nora seems to be quite different from that of Mrs. Wright. At the beginning, she is a happy mother with three children. Although she wants to pursue liberty, she still acts as a good wife who takes care of the family. Torvald’s reaction to secret makes Nora decide to leave her husband. At some point, it becomes cumbersome to predict the complex personality of Nora. Although she is expected to be ‘doll’ in her husband†™s house, she refuses to accept that role.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on The Change of Gender Roles specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More Also, the writing technique has some difference. Instead of depicting main characters directly such as in A doll’s house, Glaspell uses indirect way to portray female protagonist. The main character Minnie does not enter the stage. This is another distinction that should be taken into consideration. These literary works show how conventional gender stereotypes can be challenged. The authors demonstrate the liberation of the female protagonists who get rid of the bonds that are imposed on them. Thirdly, the writers focus on the conflicts within the family since these conflicts are driven by different perceptions of gender roles. Furthermore, the narratives in both plays are structured in a similar way. For instance, the authors want to create suspense and prompt readers t o think about the later life of the main characters. This conflict has been explored many writers living in the twentieth century (Schechet 61).  The gender roles have been challenged in two main ways in both A Doll’s House and Trifles. It is common message that comes out clearly when both plays are presented to the audience or readers. Traditional conventions are challenged not only by Nora and Mrs. Wright. Other characters also act in this way. For example, Mrs. Peters and Mrs. Hales solve the murder case and hide the evidence in effort to save Mrs. Wright. Mrs. Linde works for her family and persuade Krogstad to help Nora. By focusing on the actions of these people, the authors want to demonstrate that patriarchal view on family and society has been undermined. These literary works are important because they explain the way in which women try to cope with gender discrimination and oppression. Susan Glaspell and Henrik Ibsen describe the experiences of women who struggle with this injustice. Most importantly, they writers show how they oppose to the tradition according to which only males can play a dominant role in family or society. Works Cited Glaspell, Susan. â€Å"Trifles.† The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature. Ed. Michael Meyer. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009. Print. Ibsen, Henrik. â€Å"A Doll House.† The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature. Ed. Michael Meyer. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009. Print.Advertising Looking for essay on art and design? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Schechet, Nita. Narrative Fissures: Reading And Rhetoric, New York: Fairleigh  Dickinson University Press, 2005. Print. This essay on The Change of Gender Roles was written and submitted by user Kayson Reed to help you with your own studies. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly. You can donate your paper here.

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

The Byronic Hero Destiny and Russian Romanticism Essay Example

The Byronic Hero Destiny and Russian Romanticism Essay Example The Byronic Hero Destiny and Russian Romanticism Paper The Byronic Hero Destiny and Russian Romanticism Paper Essay Topic: Eugene Onegin Irena Curic dr. sc. Janja Ciglar-Zanic, red. prof. English Romanticism 08 January 2013 The Byronic Hero and Russian Romanticism Introduction George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, or simply Lord Byron, was a British poet of Scottish descent who is today considered to be the most influential British poet of the Romantic period (Catherine B. ONeill calls him the best-known nineteenth-century British poet outside England).His adventourous character and wild but appealing works made him famous throughout Europe. He died in Greece during the countrys war of Independence and became a legend. He was only 36 when he died but his influence was massive. His works, mostly Childe Harolds Pilgrimage and Don Juan, but also Mazeppa, the Corsair and the Prisoner of Chillon were read among the intelectual elite of the whole Europe and many poets and intelectuals became inspired to write their own works in style of Byron.It was the idea of national identity, so popular in the 19th century, that Byron s upported during his life, and the fact that he wrote about the exotic lands and their pains under the tyranny of the oppressors that made him especially popular in moulding of the new nations and their identities in southern and eastern Europe (Hocutt: Byrons influence as individual and author seemed always to have greater impact outside of England than within his prudish homeland. While imitators and admirers of Byron the individual and author could be found throughout Greece, Spain, France, Italy, Turkey, and Russia, little more than harsh criticism for his works and exile for his lifestyle emanated from his sometimes beloved, sometimes criticized native Britain, even after his death. ). Apart from his political influence, he was just as appealing to the youth who saw his quests and deeds as an impetus to rebel. In the eyes of his time, Byron was primarily looked upon as an outlaw, an immoral man. He had an affair with his stepsister and was openly sceptic of religion and political institutions.His works were filled with descriptions of decandence and abomination. His demonic heroes with weak moral compass became iconic for the writers who would be influenced by Byron. Catherine B. ONeill wrote: Childe Harold took the world by storm because of many features that we now think of as characteristic of Romantic poetry: the subjective experience of the natural wor ld, the high degree of identification between the author and the hero, the motif of a journey that is simulatneously literal and psychological, and, primarily, the isolated heros mysterious disenchantment and heartache. The Byronic hero had become a specific literary type of hero who very much resembles the writer alone. It is usually a young male (although there are female examples) who is constantly bored and unsatisfied. His spleen drives him to a constant search for new sensations, which rarely give him pleasure. He prefers solitude to the company of others and feels much more connected to nature than to people: Now Harold finds himself at lenght alone, And bade to Christian tongues a long adieu; Now he adventurd on a shore unknown, Which all admire, but many dread to view:His breast was armd `gainst fate, his wants were few; Peril he sought not, but neer shrank to meet, The scene was savage, but the scene was new; This made the ceaseless toil of travel sweet, Beat back keen winters blast, and welcomd summers heat. He finds particular characteristics of savageness to be more truthfull than society of his day which he finds corrupt and dishonest: The royal vices of our age demand A keener weapon, and a mightier hand. He takes great pleasure in satirizing contemporary events and social currents: Prepare for rhyme-I`ll publish, right or wrong: Fools are my theme, let Satire be my song. It is no secret that Byron shaped his demonic hero on his own character and his own experiences. The real background of his poems makes his scenes and adventures seem more vivid and close to the reader. So it is no wonder that his straightforward style and his hatred of censorship met with such international adoration. Byron in Russia When Byrons works conquered Europe, his influence very quickly reached Russia where his works, especially Childe Harolds Pilgrimage, inspired two of the greatest Russian Romantic writers – Alexander Pushkin and Mikhail Lermontov. When his work came to Russia, it became an instant hit among Russian authors.Even the very young authors, who would later shape the Russian realism, like Turgenev, read and admired Byrons work. Daniel Hocutt writes that Most Russian writers viewed Byrons work in one of two ways: late sentimentalists admired his vivid and tender sensitivity; later Romantics emphasized their heros bleak colouring and rebellious passions . Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin was the first Russian author to publicly praise Byron and openly imitate his style. E ugene Onegin: the first Russian Byronic hero? Alexander Pushkin was the first authentic Russian Romantic poet and the leader of the National Romantic movement.He appreciated Byron and used the motive of the Byronic hero in his best known work Eugene Onegin. Pushkin imitated high Byronism in his narrative poems and lyrics written in Southern Russia between 1820 and 1824 Readers compared Pushkins and Byrons lives, focusing on sexual scandal, exile, and advocacy for Greek and other nationalist movements. Pushkin briefly encouraged such comparisons, announcing in 1822 that his new poem-in-progress, Eugene Onegin, was in spirit of Don Juan, but he quickly backtracked when his satire suffered from comparison to Byrons. Eugene Onegin, the protagonist of the work, is a young man who suffers from the typical Romantic boredom, the spleen. The work begins when Eugene grows bored of St. Petersburg (city, the very place of corruption) and wants to run away from his life there. He has even grown t ired of women and has given up his books. After death of his uncle, he goes away to the countryside. There he meets a young woman Tatyana who falls in love with him. However, being a cold Romantic outsider, Eugene politely turns her down only to fall in love with her in the end of the story.But then it is her turn to turn him down because she has a husband and does not want to compromise her pride and reputation. Although Pushkin tried to make his main character resemble a Byronic hero (Eugene even has a picture of Byron on his shelf), when he gave him the power to confess his feelings and change his nature, he moved away from the original, thus creating a specific type of a Russian Romantic hero: a hero with pretensions to change his miserable destiny. A true Byronic hero would carry on with his fate, without trying to change it and would most certainly continue running away from his emotions.Byronic Hero of our Time Mikhail Yuryevich Lermontov was killed in a gun duel, much like his predecessor Pushkin, at an early age of 27. It is interesting that they both had their main characters fight duels in their books. Of course, Onegin and Pechorin both managed to save their lives. Mikhail Lermontov had a much more complicated relationship with his British idol. First, he admitted resemblance to Byron in his poem Dont think me worthy of pity and then stated that he is not Byron but a true Russian poet in his poem No, Im not Byron:No, Im not Byron; I am, yet, Another choice for the sacred dole, Like him a persecuted soul, But only of the Russian set. I early start and end the whole, And will not win the future days; Like in an ocean, in my soul, A cargo of lost hopes stays. Who, oh, my ocean severe, Could read all secrets in your scroll? Wholl tell the people my idea? Im God or no one at all! However, he is the Russian author who managed to come the closest to the original idea of a Byronic hero through the character of Pechorin in his work Hero of our Time.Although he made a whole list of Byronic references, such as doctor Verner having a limp, or Princess Mary reading Byron among other authors, it is the protagonist, Grigory Alexandrovich Pechorin that captur es our imagination from the first page. He suffers from spleen, enjoys danger and seduction of beautiful women. He does not do it purely for the fun, which we can clearly see from his journal, but is afraid of commitment and therefore runs away from his feelings.He chooses to stay unhappy in order to keep his freedom: Id make any sacrifice but thistwenty times I can stake my life, even my honor, but my freedom Ill never sell. Why do I prize it so much? What do I find in it? What am I aiming at? What have I to expect from the future? Nothing, absolutely nothing. Its some innate fear, an inexplicable foreboding . . . Conclusion Russia of the early 19th century was a gloomy and turbulent place. It was a time of growing nationalist ideas and revolutionary thoughts, a time of lord Byrons literary influence. Byrons struggles and support for national and regional independence movements influenced Decembrists and other revolutionaries in the 1820s. One such revolutionary was Alexander Pushkin, most famous of the Russian Romantic poets, who was exiled to his mothers estate as a result of his involvement in and support of the 1825 uprising. Pushkins impact on Russian Romanticism cannot be minimized, particularly as it relates to Mikhail Lermontov, the last famous Russian Romantic writer. Voraciously reading Byrons poetry and prose in the original, in translation, and in loose interpretation, these Russian writers dedicated themselves for over a decade to write as Byron wrote and to live as Byron lived. Both Pushkin and Lermontov thoroughly read and enjoyed Byrons work and each of them by being a bit of Byronic her oes themselves, helped to shape a new type of a Russian Romantic hero.

Sunday, February 23, 2020

The International Soccer Performance Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words

The International Soccer Performance - Essay Example   There are hundreds of teams playing soccer around the world; some are organized as professionals while others are just amateurs. Professional teams exist in various countries in which they recruit the best players from around the world and pay them salaries while the amateurs play for fun. Nowadays, the best professional teams are in Europe, especially England and Spain that represent the best choices for any professional. This author informs: â€Å"The Spanish domestic football league is often considered to be among the best in the world. Spanish Clubs such as Real Madrid and FC Barcelona feature prominently in international club competitions†(Hoffmann, Ging & Ramasamy). Indeed, Real Madrid and Barcelona are among the best clubs in the world with their star players like Cristiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi who display their talents on Kandy 2 stadiums every week. However, the English Premier league also has very talented teams even though they are being challenged by other European countries: â€Å"After years of unquestioned supremacy as the top-to-bottom best soccer league in the world, the English Premier League has been chased down by the rest of Europe† (Manfred). ... Each country around the world dreams of organizing the world cup or at least to participate in the tournament. Organized every four years in a chosen country, all football fans and professionals around the universe converge to that place to enjoy the best moments of football. The following statement reveals: â€Å"The FIFA World Cup is one of the largest events in the world. The competition between the best national teams in the world mobi ­lizes billions of people from all continents, cultures, ethnicities, and creeds. It rouses passions and, at the same time, lessens differences† (Brazem). This passion and attraction make the event the most important event in the world of football. Moreover, other significant trophies and tournaments exist all around the world and in each continent. For instance, the champions’ league in Europe, the confederation cup in South America, the African cup of nations and other competitions in other parts of the world are all significant t ournaments that display great trophies. This article exposes: â€Å"Real have won more European cups than any other club (8 wins). Barcelona is the current record holders for the European Cup-Winners’ Cup (4 wins)† Kandy 3 (Hoffman, Ging & Ramasamy). These records demonstrate the talent of Spanish teams and their hold on most trophies and tournaments. C. The most famous Stadiums and their Capacity Beautiful and legendary stadiums exist all around the world and in all sizes. The best teams in the universe play in magnificent infrastructures that reflect their talent and standards. With a capacity of 75,811 people, Manchester United’s mythic stadium, Old Trafford, represents one of the world’s most famous but also biggest stadiums in the universe: â€Å"It might be the most famous football ground in the world, which sometimes might work against United as teams always bring  their top game to play there† (Rizzy).